7 Benefits of Having Your Baby Face You in a Stroller

A baby faces her mom and sibling in a stroller

A parent-facing stroller is beneficial to you and your baby. It helps keep you and your baby connected, encouraging more parent-baby interaction. A baby stroller that faces you is also developmentally better and physically safer for your baby while providing you peace of mind because you can keep a close eye on your little one.

Your Baby Benefits While Facing Forward in a Stroller

Provides emotional comfort.

In a rear-facing stroller, your baby sees your face, as well as sees you talking to him. Seeing your familiar face comforts him emotionally and helps him feel safe.

Good for baby’s development.

Developmentally, when a baby is between 2-6 months old, he needs and likes seeing his parents’ faces. He craves social exchanges with you. Babies also start learning the rules of social interaction and basing their reactions on your facial expressions during their first few months of life. And in a rear-facing baby stroller, you can more easily give your baby this kind of stimulation that he needs for development.

A baby faces dad in a stroller

Offers more support and protection.

The main reasons to keep your baby in a rear-facing car seat is because it provides the best support and protection for their little head and body—the same is true with rear-facing strollers. Before your baby is strong enough to support his own head, he needs extra head and neck support that most strollers that face you offer. Just think if you accidentally ran into the curb or a fire hydrant while walking. If your infant was facing forward, his head would jerk forward from the impact. But when he’s facing you, the impact won’t throw his head forward or cause any harm to his head or neck.

Can help them nap better.

A study from 2008 that observed more than 2,700 babies and their parents found that these babies were twice as likely to sleep when they were in a rear-facing stroller. Some attribute this to luck, while others believe it’s because infants feel safer and more relaxed when looking at a familiar face so they more easily fall asleep.

A baby faces parents in a stroller

You Benefit While Your Baby Faces Forward in a Stroller

Easily monitor your baby.

When your baby is facing you, it’s so much easier to keep an eye on him. With a simple glance down, as often as you want, you can make sure he’s comfortable, make sure his hat hasn’t fallen over his eyes, make sure the wind isn’t blowing in his face, etc.

Gives you peace of mind.

Seeing and knowing your baby is safe and comfortable allows you to relax and actually enjoy this time with your son.

Makes it easier to bond with your baby.

That study I mentioned above also found that when the observed babies were facing their parents in a stroller that the parents were twice as likely to talk to their babies and the babies were more likely to laugh. When your baby is right in front of you, you’re prone to make more eye contact, talk more to and laugh more with your baby. Plus, you just get to see more of your adorable little one, and what parent doesn’t want to just stare at their baby? Soon he’ll be more interested in the outside world, so take it from a fellow mama and soak in those baby stares as long as you can.

A stroller is an expensive but necessary purchase, as are those neat stroller accessories. And while there are numerous benefits to having a stroller where your baby faces you, when your little guy’s development starts changing between 6-9 months, he’ll become more interested in what’s happening around him. At this point, you’ll want to start having him face forward in a stroller. But there’s no need to spend money on two strollers. Get a reversible seat stroller that offers rear-facing and forward-facing positions. That way you can easily switch between the stroller facing you and facing outward based on your baby’s developmental level and his preference.

Kirsten Metcalf

Kirsten Metcalf is a writer, editor and mother to a hilarious but very strong-willed toddler and a beautiful baby girl. She started writing short stories in elementary school and years later became a sports reporter and editor. Now, she mainly writes marketing, religious and parenting-related blog posts. Even before she knew she wanted to be a writer, Kirsten knew she wanted to be a mom. She knows being a mom is one of the most rewarding but hardest jobs out there, which is why she loves being able to share parenting knowledge and support to other moms through her writing. When she actually wins negotiations with her toddler, Kirsten likes to reward herself by watching KU basketball, eating cheesecake, or going on a Target run by herself.

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